Wits Business School Journal

A selection of stories published in the Wits Business School Journal.

SA skills shortage: Crisis or Urban legend?

‘SKILLS SHORTAGE’ and brain drain’ are phrases that make for ubiquitous headlines.

The 2010 Soccer World Cup, Gautrain and other infrastructure construction projects will demand much of South Africa’s pool of qualified and experienced people and the perception that the pool is nearly empty has raised alarm…

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Connectivity for development

When the first spate of xenophobic attacks hit last year, Google South Africa found out that 89 percent of South Africans searching online for information, didn’t know how to spell xenophobia…

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Features for Heartlines and ForGood

A selection of subbed and unsubbed stories that were meant to be part of a news feature service for Heartlines’ ForGood campaign. The brief for these was to focus on everyday heroes and the value of values.

star-forest-town

Soldiers on a special mission: to help kids with special-needs

They ride their motorcycles through roaring flames and once had a recordbreaking 56 people perched on eight motorcycles.
Now they’re tasked with sanding floors, knocking holes in walls for doors and fixing drainage.
Members of the British Army’s Royal Signals White Helmets Motorbike Display team may have expected better weather in Johannesburg. Instead, they were welcomed by the dripping summer rains. However, it’s still warmer than their weather back home, and the team walks through the Forest Town School for children with special needs, sans their white bike helmets, in shorts and t-shirts. Their mission is simple and determined…

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Township Flowers

Blurb: Elliot Mlalazi has created an oasis in the township he calls home on the West Rand. Situated in Rietvallei the flowers and green foliage are an indication of his dedication to his trade.

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Bright Young Helping Hands

It’s hard to see your hand in front of your face inside the Motorcyle Spares Centre in the middle of Johannesburg town. Candles stuck in old amstel bottles provide meager illumination and it takes some time for your eyes to adjust. This darkness is not due to loadshedding in practice, it’s like this every night. The abandoned building provides shelter to approximately 30 people who would otherwise be at the mercy of the city streets. Gregory Skinner, a fourth year medical student examines a baby who’s been coughing up blood. His mother, Mamelo, one of the inhabitants, holds a crying Prince up on a rough wooden table while Skinner tries to check what’s causing the two-month-old’s symptoms…

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Teaching values through storytelling

A wise ant and a frivolous grasshopper taught millions of children the value of saving for days of necessity. This and other lessons learnt from the fables of Aesop, a slave who probably lived over two thousand years ago, still resonate with children and adults the world over. Educational psychologist and senior lecturer at the University of Johannesburg Dr Elzette Fritz agrees that storytelling is an effective way to teach children about values…

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some sage and thyme for the sprogs

Our very own Meme Queen Kaye has been knocking the flints together and Shafs wants to know what ten things I would like the watermelons from my loins to know.

  1. If you have sex before marriage, your hoo-hoo will turn blue and fall off. (Ok, maybe it won’t. I’m hoping our conversations about things of this nature will not get awkward when you’re older and have stopped calling it a hoo-hoo.)
  2. Not everyone will like you. Sometimes I may not even like you. But I love you and would die for you.
  3. You won’t be good at everything, but you will be great at a few things.
  4. Always acknowledge anyone who has done a service to you (from waiters to car guards to that cashier who looks like someone farted in her cereal). Thank with sincerity and a smile in your eyes.
  5. Give of what you can, and often.
  6. Your parents aren’t perfect.
  7. Don’t carry any tales unless they’re meant to be written down and read aloud.
  8. If you are your mother’s child, your teenage years will be awkward and angsty. It will pass, and when you read your old diaries, you will laugh at what the adult you will see as frivolous intensities.
  9. While your mother’s desk may still have a ‘there be dragons’ notice pointing to it, being neat and organised really does unclutter your thinking.
  10. Confidence is an easy trick to pull off. Fake it till you make it.